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Pumpkin Biscuits

A good snack to make for your hungry little ones in the fall!  Children can easily help in every step, except the oven.

1 cup pumpkin puree

2 1/2 cups Bisqick mix

Flour (to cover board)

Milk (to brush over biscuits)

Butter or honey

Combine pumpkin puree and bisquick mix, turn onto floured board.  Knead until dough is stiff.  Roll to 1/2 inch thickness. Cut into 1 1/2 inch rounds. Place ungreased pan and brush with milk (my kids like to “paint” the biscuits!)   Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes.  Serve warm with butter or honey.  Makes about two dozen.

Mixed-up Cereal

A yummy fall snack that the littlest ones can make on their own!  Have an assortment of cereal in large bowls.  For example, Cheerios, Chex and mini-Shredded Wheat.  All of these have the organic equivalent at most grocery stores. Each child gets a baggie or small bowl to create the combination he or she wants.

A mini math lesson can easily be created with the cereal mix.  

Skip counting: Two, three or four of each cereal placed in a group. Practice skip counting touching the piles as you count.

Addition:  Grab any of two kinds of cereal (three for three addends), separate into piles. Count the amount in each pile and write on paper or whiteboard in a number sentence or equation (Example: 6+7=).  Count the total to get the answer.

Subtraction: Count the total amount of cereal and eat three (whatever number you want) then ask how many are left.  Write the equation out or if child is older have them write.

Division and multiplication:  Start with a number of cereal such as 15.  Have the child separate into equal groups, so they could make three groups of five, five groups of three or even one group of 15 or 15 groups of one.   For younger children guide them with the amount of groups.  You could say, “How can you make three even groups with your cereal?”  You can even draw three circles on paper to make it easy for them to divide.   Multiply or skip count once they are separated to show the relationship with multiplication and division.

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